Peripheral artery disease - legs

Definition

Peripheral artery disease is a condition of the blood vessels. It leads to narrowing and hardening of the arteries that supply the legs and feet.

The narrowing of the blood vessels decreases blood flow. This can cause injury to nerves and other tissues.

Causes

Peripheral artery disease is caused by arteriosclerosis, which is also known as hardening of the arteries. For example, this problem occurs when fatty material (plaque) builds up on and in the walls of your arteries. This causes the arteries to become narrower. The walls of the arteries also become stiffer and cannot widen (dilate) to allow greater blood flow when needed.

As a result, when the muscles of your legs are working harder (such as during exercise or walking) they cannot get enough blood and oxygen. As the arteries get narrower, there may not be enough blood and oxygen, even when the muscles are resting.

Peripheral artery disease is a common disorder that usually affects men over age 50. People are at higher risk if they have a history of:

Symptoms

The main symptoms are pain, achiness, fatigue, burning, or discomfort in the muscles of your feet, calves, or thighs. These symptoms usually appear during walking or exercise and go away after several minutes of rest.

When peripheral artery disease becomes severe, you may have:

Exams and Tests

During an examination, the health care provider may find:

When PAD is more severe, findings may include:

Blood tests may show high cholesterol or diabetes.

Tests for peripheral artery disease:

Treatment

Medicines may be needed to control the disorder, including:

If you are taking medicines for high blood pressure or diabetes, take them as your doctor has prescribed.

Surgery may be done if the condition is severe and is affecting your ability to work or do important activities, or you are having pain at rest. Options are:

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most of the time, you can control peripheral artery disease of the legs without surgery. Surgery provides good symptom relief in severe cases.

For complications, the affected leg or foot may need to be amputated.

Possible Complications

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have:


Review Date: 6/6/2013
Reviewed By: Matthew M. Cooper, MD, FACS, Cardiovascular & Thoracic Surgery; Medical Director, CareCore National, Bluffton, SC. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.