Bacterial gastroenteritis

Definition

Bacterial gastroenteritis is present when bacteria cause an infection of the stomach and intestines

Causes

Bacterial gastroenteritis can affect 1 person or a group of people who all ate the same food. It is commonly called food poisoning. It often occurs after eating at picnics, school cafeterias, large social gatherings, or restaurants.

The germs may get into your food (called contamination) in many ways:

Food poisoning often occurs from eating or drinking:

Many different types of bacteria can cause bacterial gastroenteritis, including:

Symptoms

Symptoms depend on the type of bacteria that caused the sickness. All types of food poisoning cause diarrhea. Other symptoms include:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will examine you for signs of food poisoning. These may include pain in the stomach and signs your body does not have as much water and fluids as it should (dehydration).

Lab tests may be done on the food or a stool sample to find out what germ is causing your symptoms. However, these tests do not always show the cause of the diarrhea.

Tests may also be done to look for white blood cells in the stool. This is a sign of infection.

Treatment

You will most likely recover from the most common types of bacterial gastroenteritis in a couple of days. The goal is to make you feel better and avoid dehydration.

Drinking enough fluids and learning what to eat will help ease symptoms. You may need to:

If you have diarrhea and are unable to drink or keep down fluids because of nausea or vomiting, you may need fluids through a vein (IV). Young children may be at extra risk of getting dehydrated.

If you take diuretics ("water pills"), talk to your provider. You may need to stop taking the diuretic while you have diarrhea. Never stop or change your medicines without first talking to your provider.

Antibiotics are not prescribed very often for most common types of bacterial gastroenteritis. If diarrhea is very severe or you have a weakened immune system, antibiotics may be needed.

You can buy medicines at the drugstore that can help stop or slow diarrhea.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Most people get better in a few days without treatment.

Certain rare types of E coli can cause severe anemia, gastrointestinal bleeding or even kidney failure.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have:

Also call if:

Prevention

Take precautions to prevent food poisoning.


Review Date: 10/27/2015
Reviewed By: Subodh K. Lal, MD, gastroenterologist at Gastrointestinal Specialists of Georgia, Austell, GA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.