Ascites

Definition

Ascites is the build-up of fluid in the space between the lining of the abdomen and abdominal organs.

Causes

Ascites results from high pressure in the blood vessels of the liver (portal hypertension) and low levels of a protein called albumin.

Diseases that can cause severe liver damage can lead to ascites. These include:

People with certain cancers in the abdomen may develop ascites. These include cancer of the appendix, colon, ovaries, uterus, pancreas, and liver.

Other conditions that can cause this problem include:

Kidney dialysis may also be linked to ascites.

Symptoms

Symptoms may develop slowly or suddenly depending on the cause of ascites. You may have no symptoms if there is only a small amount of fluid in the belly.

As more fluid collects, you may have abdominal pain and bloating. Large amounts of fluid can cause shortness of breath.

Many other symptoms of liver failure may also be present.

Exams and Tests

Your doctor will do a physical exam to determine the amount of swelling in your belly.

You may also have the following tests to assess your liver and kidneys:

Your doctor may also use a thin needle to withdraw ascites fluid from your belly. The fluid is tested to look for the cause of ascites and to check if the fluid is infected.

Treatment

The condition that causes ascites will be treated, if possible.

Treatments for fluid build-up may include lifestyle changes:

You may also get medicines from your doctor, including:

Other things you can do to help take care of your liver disease are:

Procedures that you may have are:

People with end-stage liver disease may need a liver transplant.

If you have cirrhosis, avoid taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) and naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn). Acetaminophen should be taken in reduced doses.

Possible Complications

Complications may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

If you have ascites, call your health care provider right away if you have:


Review Date: 6/21/2018
Reviewed By: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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