Systemic lupus erythematosus

Definition

Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune disease. In this disease, the body's immune system mistakenly attacks healthy tissue. It can affect the skin, joints, kidneys, brain, and other organs.

Causes

The cause of autoimmune diseases is not fully known.

SLE is more common in women than men. It may occur at any age. However, it appears most often in people between the ages of 15 and 44. The disease affects African Americans and Asians more often than people from other races.

Certain drugs may also cause SLE.

Symptoms

Symptoms vary from person to person, and may come and go. Almost everyone with SLE has joint pain and swelling. Some develop arthritis. SLE often affects the joints of the fingers, hands, wrists, and knees.

Other common symptoms include:

Other symptoms depend on which part of the body is affected:

Some people have only skin symptoms. This is called discoid lupus.

Exams and Tests

To be diagnosed with lupus, you must have 4 out of 11 common signs of the disease. Nearly all people with lupus have a positive test for antinuclear antibody (ANA). However, having a positive ANA alone does not mean you have lupus.

The health care provider will do a complete physical exam. You may have a rash, arthritis, or edema in the ankles. There may be an abnormal sound called a heart friction rub or pleural friction rub. Your provider will also do a nervous system exam.

Tests used to diagnose SLE may include:

You may also have other tests to learn more about your condition. Some of these are:

Treatment

There is no cure for SLE. The goal of treatment is to control symptoms. Severe symptoms that involve the heart, lungs, kidneys, and other organs often need treatment from specialists.

Mild forms of the disease may be treated with:

Treatments for more severe SLE may include:

If you have SLE, it is also important to:

Support Groups

Counseling and support groups may help with the emotional issues involved with the disease.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome for people with SLE has improved in recent years. Many people with SLE have mild symptoms. How well you do depends on how severe the disease is.

The disease tends to be more active:

Many women with SLE can get pregnant and deliver a healthy baby. A good outcome is more likely for women who receive proper treatment and do not have serious heart or kidney problems. However, the presence of SLE antibodies raises the risk of miscarriage.

Possible Complications

Some people with SLE have abnormal deposits in the kidney cells. This leads to a condition called lupus nephritis. People with this problem may develop kidney failure. They may need dialysis or a kidney transplant.

SLE can cause damage in many different parts of the body, including:

Both SLE and some of the medicines used for SLE can harm an unborn child. Talk to your provider before you become pregnant. If you become pregnant, find a provider who is experienced with lupus and pregnancy.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have symptoms of SLE. Also call if you have this disease and your symptoms get worse or a new symptom occurs.


Review Date: 1/16/2016
Reviewed By: Gordon A. Starkebaum, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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