Rhabdomyolysis

Definition

Rhabdomyolysis is the breakdown of muscle tissue that leads to the release of muscle fiber contents into the blood. These substances are harmful to the kidney and often cause kidney damage.

Causes

When muscle is damaged, a protein called myoglobin is released into the bloodstream. It is then filtered out of the body by the kidneys. Myoglobin breaks down into substances that can damage kidney cells.

Rhabdomyolysis may be caused by injury or any other condition that damages skeletal muscle.

Problems that may lead to this disease include:

Symptoms

Symptoms may include:

Other symptoms that may occur with this disease:

Exams and Tests

A physical exam will show tender or damaged skeletal muscles.

The following tests may be done:

This disease may also affect the results of the following tests:

Treatment

You will need to get fluids containing bicarbonate to help prevent kidney damage. You may need to get fluids through a vein (IV). Some people may need kidney dialysis.

Your health care provider may prescribe medicines including diuretics and bicarbonate (if there is enough urine output).

Hyperkalemia and low blood calcium levels (hypocalcemia) should be treated right away. Kidney failure should also be treated.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome depends on the amount of kidney damage. Acute kidney failure occurs in many people. Getting treated soon after rhabdomyolysis begins will reduce the risk of permanent kidney damage.

People with milder cases may return to their normal activities within a few weeks to a month. However, some people continue to have problems with fatigue and muscle pain.

Possible Complications

Complications may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you have symptoms of rhabdomyolysis.

Prevention

Drink plenty of fluids after strenuous exercise. This will help to dilute your urine and flush any myoglobin that is released from your muscles out of your kidneys. Also drink a lot of fluids after any condition that may have damaged skeletal muscle.


Review Date: 9/22/2015
Reviewed By: Charles Silberberg, DO, private practice specializing in nephrology, Affiliated with New York Medical College, Division of Nephrology, Valhalla, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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