Testicular torsion

Definition

Testicular torsion is the twisting of the spermatic cord, which supports the testes in the scrotum. When this occurs, blood supply is cut off to the testicles and nearby tissue in the scrotum.

Causes

Some men are more prone to this condition because of defects in the connective tissue within the scrotum. The problem may also occur after an injury to the scrotum that results in a lot of swelling, or following heavy exercise. In some cases, there is no clear cause.

The condition is more common during the first year of life and at the beginning of adolescence (puberty). However, it may happen in older men.

Symptoms

Symptoms include:

Additional symptoms that may be associated with this disease:

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will examine you. The exam may show:

You may have a Doppler ultrasound of the testicle to check the blood flow. There will be no blood flowing through the area if you have complete torsion. Blood flow may be reduced if the cord is partly twisted.

Treatment

Most of the time, surgery is needed to correct the problem. Surgery should be done as soon as possible after symptoms begin. If it is performed within 6 hours, most testicles can be saved.

During surgery, the testicle on the other side is often secured into place as well. This is because the unaffected testicle is at risk of testicular torsion in the future.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The testicle may continue to function properly if the condition is found early and treated right away. The chances that the testicle will need to be removed increase if blood flow is reduced for more than 6 hours. However, the testicle may lose its ability to function if torsion has lasted fewer than 6 hours.

Possible Complications

The testicle may shrink if blood supply is cut off for an extended time. It may need to be surgically removed. Shrinkage of the testicle may occur days to months after the torsion has been corrected. Severe infection of the testicle and scrotum is also possible if the blood flow is restricted for an extended period.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Get emergency medical attention if you have symptoms of testicular torsion.

Prevention

Take steps to avoid injury to the scrotum. Many cases cannot be prevented.


Review Date: 8/31/2015
Reviewed By: Jennifer Sobol, DO, urologist at the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Isla Ogilvie, PhD, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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