Meningitis - tuberculous

Definition

Tuberculous meningitis is an infection of the tissues covering the brain and spinal cord (meninges).

Causes

Tuberculous meningitis is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis. This is the bacteria that causes tuberculosis (TB). The bacteria spread to the brain and spine from another place in the body, usually the lung.

Tuberculous meningitis is very rare in the United States. Most cases are people who traveled to the United States from other countries where TB is common.

People who have the following have a higher chance of developing tuberculous meningitis:

Symptoms

The symptoms often start slowly, and may include:

Other symptoms that can occur with this disease may include:

Exams and Tests

The health care provider will examine you. This will usually show that you have the following:

A lumbar puncture (spinal tap) is an important test in diagnosing meningitis. It is done to collect a sample of spinal fluid for examination. More than one sample may be needed to make the diagnosis.

Other tests that may be done include:

Treatment

You will be given several medicines to fight the TB bacteria. Sometimes, treatment is started even if your provider thinks you have the disease, but testing has not confirmed it yet.

Treatment usually lasts for at least 12 months. Medicines called corticosteroids may also be used.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Tuberculous meningitis is life threatening if untreated. Long-term follow-up is needed to detect repeated infections (recurrences).

Possible Complications

Untreated, the disease can cause any of the following:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call the local emergency number (such as 911) or go to an emergency room if you suspect meningitis in a young child who has the following symptoms:

Call the local emergency number if you develop any of the serious symptoms listed above. Meningitis can quickly become a life-threatening illness.

Prevention

Treating people who have signs of a non-active (dormant) TB infection can prevent its spread. A PPD test and other TB tests can be done to tell if you have this type of infection.

Some countries with a high incidence of TB give people a vaccine called BCG to prevent TB. But, the effectiveness of this vaccine is limited, and it is not usually used in the United States. The BCG vaccine may help prevent severe forms of TB, such as meningitis, in very young children who live in areas where the disease is common.


Review Date: 11/27/2016
Reviewed By: Arnold Lentnek, MD, Infectious Diseases Medical Practice of NY and Clinical Research Centers of CT. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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