Genital herpes

Definition

Genital herpes is a sexually transmitted infection (STI). It is caused by the herpes simplex virus (HSV).

This article focuses on HSV type 2 (HSV-2) infection.

Causes

Genital herpes affects the skin or mucous membranes of the genitals. The virus is spread from one person to another during sexual contact.

There are two kinds of HSV:

You may become infected with herpes if your skin, vagina, penis, or mouth comes into contact with someone who already has herpes.

You are most likely to get herpes if you touch the skin of someone who has herpes sores, blisters, or a rash. But the virus can still be spread even when no sores or other symptoms are present. In some cases, you do not know you are infected.

Genital HSV-2 infections are more common in women than men.

Symptoms

Many people with genital herpes never have sores. Or they have very mild symptoms that go unnoticed or are mistaken for insect bites or another skin condition.

If signs and symptoms do occur during the first outbreak, they can be severe. This first outbreak usually happens within 2 days to 2 weeks of being infected.

General symptoms may include:

Genital symptoms include small, painful blisters filled with clear or straw-colored fluid. They are usually found:

Other symptoms may include:

A second outbreak can appear weeks or months later. It is usually less severe and goes away sooner than the first outbreak. Over time, the number of outbreaks may decrease.

Exams and Tests

Tests can be done on skin sores or blisters to diagnose herpes. These tests are most often done when someone has a first outbreak and when a pregnant women develops genital herpes symptoms. Tests include:

Treatment

Genital herpes cannot be cured. Antiviral medicines may be prescribed:

Pregnant women may be treated for herpes during the last month of pregnancy to reduce the chance of having an outbreak at the time of delivery. If there is an outbreak around the time of delivery, a C-section will be recommended to reduce the chance of infecting the baby.

Possible side effects from herpes medicines include:

Follow your health care provider's advice on how to care for your herpes symptoms at home.

Support Groups

You can ease the stress of illness by joining a herpes support group. Sharing with others who have common experiences and problems can help you not feel alone. 

Outlook (Prognosis)

Once you are infected, the virus stays in your body for the rest of your life. Some people never have another episode. Others have frequent outbreaks that can be triggered by fatigue, illness, menstruation, or stress.

Possible Complications

Pregnant women who have an active genital herpes infection when they give birth may pass the infection to their baby.

The virus may spread to other parts of the body, including the brain, eyes, esophagus, liver, spinal cord, or lungs. These complications often develop in people who have a weakened immune system due to HIV or certain medicines.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your health care provider if you have any symptoms of genital herpes or if you develop fever, headache, vomiting, or other symptoms during or after an outbreak of herpes.

Prevention

The best way not to get genital herpes is to avoid all sexual contact, including oral sex.

Being in a long-term, mutually monogamous relationship with someone who has been tested and has never been infected with the virus can also help reduce your chance of becoming infected. If you have genital herpes, you should tell your partner that you have the disease, even if you do not have symptoms.

Condoms are the best way to protect against catching genital herpes during sexual activity:


Review Date: 8/5/2013
Reviewed By: Susan Storck, MD, FACOG, Chief, Eastside Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound, Bellevue, Washington; Clinical Teaching Faculty, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.