Tonsillitis is inflammation (swelling) of the tonsils.


The tonsils are lymph nodes in the back of the mouth and top of the throat. They help to filter out bacteria and other germs to prevent infection in the body.

A bacterial or viral infection can cause tonsillitis. Strep throat is a common cause.

The infection may also be seen in other parts of the throat. One such infection is called pharyngitis.

Tonsillitis is very common in children.


Common symptoms may be:

Other problems or symptoms that may occur are:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will look in the mouth and throat.

A rapid strep test can be done in most providers' offices. However, this test may be normal, and you can still have strep. Your provider may send the throat swab to a laboratory for a strep culture. Test results can take a few days.


Swollen tonsils that are not painful or do not cause other problems do not need to be treated. Your provider may not give you antibiotics. You may be asked to come back for a checkup later.

If tests show you do have strep, your provider will give you antibiotics. It is important to finish all of your antibiotics as directed, even if you feel better. If you do not take them all, the infection can return.

The following tips may help your throat feel better:

Some people who have repeated infections may need surgery to remove the tonsils (tonsillectomy).

Outlook (Prognosis)

Tonsillitis symptoms due to strep will often get better within 2 or 3 days after you start the antibiotics.

Children with strep throat should be kept home from school or day care until they have been on antibiotics for 24 hours. This helps reduce the spread of illness.

Possible Complications

Complications from strep throat may be severe. They may include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if there is:

Review Date: 12/9/2016
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Assistant Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.