Histrionic personality disorder

Definition

Histrionic personality disorder is a mental condition in which people act in a very emotional and dramatic way that draws attention to themselves.

Causes

Causes of histrionic personality disorder are unknown. Genes and early childhood events may be responsible. It is diagnosed more often in women than in men. Doctors believe that more men may have the disorder than are diagnosed.

Histrionic personality disorder usually begins by late teens or early 20s.

Symptoms

People with this disorder are usually able to function at a high level and can be successful socially and at work.

Symptoms include:

Exams and Tests

Histrionic personality disorder is diagnosed based on a psychological evaluation. The health care provider will consider how long and how severe the person's symptoms are.

The provider can diagnose histrionic personality disorder by looking at the person's:

Treatment

People with this condition often seek treatment when they have depression or anxiety from failed romantic relationships or other conflicts with people. Medicine may help the symptoms. Talk therapy is the best treatment for the condition itself.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Histrionic personality disorder can improve with talk therapy and sometimes medicines. Left untreated, it can cause problems in people's personal lives and prevent them from doing their best at work.

Possible Complications

Histrionic personality disorder may affect a person's social or romantic relationships. The person may be unable to cope with losses or failures. The person may change jobs often because of boredom and not being able to deal with frustration. They may crave new things and excitement, which leads to risky situations. All of these factors may lead to a higher chance of depression or suicidal thoughts.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

See your provider or mental health professional if you or someone you know has symptoms of histrionic personality disorder.


Review Date: 10/7/2018
Reviewed By: Ryan James Kimmel, MD, Medical Director of Hospital Psychiatry at the University of Washington Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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