Language disorders in children

Definition

Language disorder in children refers to problems with either of the following:

Children with language disorders are able to produce sounds, and their speech can be understood.

Causes

For most infants and children, language develops naturally beginning at birth. To develop language, a child must be able to hear, see, understand, and remember. Children must also have the physical ability to form speech.

Up to 1 of every 20 children has symptoms of a language disorder. When the cause is unknown, it is called a developmental language disorder.

Problems with receptive language skills usually begin before age 4. Some mixed language disorders are caused by a brain injury. These conditions are sometimes misdiagnosed as developmental disorders.

Language disorders may occur in children with other developmental problems, autism spectrum disorder, hearing loss, and learning disabilities. A language disorder may also be caused by damage to the central nervous system, which is called aphasia.

Language disorders are rarely caused by a lack of intelligence.

Language disorders are different than delayed language. With delayed language, the child develops speech and language in the same way as other children, but later. In language disorders, speech and language do not develop normally. The child may have some language skills, but not others. Or, the way in which these skills develop will be different than usual.

Symptoms

A child with language disorder may have one or two of the symptoms listed below, or many of the symptoms. Symptoms can range from mild to severe.

Children with a receptive language disorder have difficulty understanding language. They may have:

Children with an expressive language disorder have problems using language to express what they are thinking or need. These children may:

Because of their language problems, these children may have difficulty in social settings. At times, language disorders may be part of the cause of severe behavioral problems.

Exams and Tests

A medical history may reveal that the child has close relatives who have also had speech and language problems.

Any child suspected of having this disorder can have standardized receptive and expressive language tests. A speech and language therapist or neuropsychologist will administer these tests.

A hearing test called audiometry should also be done to rule out deafness, which is one of the most common causes of language problems.

Treatment

Speech and language therapy is the best approach to treating this type of language disorder.

Counseling, such as talk therapy, is also recommended because of the possibility of related emotional or behavioral problems.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outcome varies, based on the cause. Brain injury or other structural problems generally have a poor outcome, in which the child will have long-term problems with language. Other, more reversible causes can be treated effectively.

Many children who have language problems during the preschool years will also have some language problems or learning difficulty later in childhood. They may also have reading disorders.

Possible Complications

Difficulty understanding and using language can cause problems with social interaction and the ability to function independently as an adult.

Reading may be a problem.

Depression, anxiety, and other emotional or behavioral problems may complicate language disorders.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Parents who are concerned that their child's speech or language is delayed should see their child's doctor. Ask about getting a referral to a speech and language therapist.

Children who are diagnosed with this condition may need to be seen by a neurologist or children's developmental specialist to determine if the cause can be treated.

Call your child's doctor if you see the following signs that your child does not understand language well:

Also call if you notice these signs that your child does not use or express language well:


Review Date: 4/30/2018
Reviewed By: Amit M. Shelat, DO, FACP, Attending Neurologist and Assistant Professor of Clinical Neurology, SUNY Stony Brook, School of Medicine, Stony Brook, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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