Infant test/procedure preparation

Definition

Being prepared before your infant has a medical test can help you know what to expect during the test. It will also help reduce your anxiety so that you can help keep your infant as calm and comfortable as possible.

Information

Be aware that your child will likely cry and restraints may be used. You can help your infant through this procedure the most by being there and showing you care.

Crying is a normal response to the strange environment, unfamiliar people, restraints, and separation from you. Your infant will cry more for these reasons than because the test or procedure is uncomfortable.

WHY RESTRAINTS?

Infants lack the physical control, coordination, and ability to follow commands that older children most often have. Restraints may be used during a procedure or other situation to ensure your infant's safety. For example, in order to get clear test results on an x-ray, there cannot be any movement. Your infant may be restrained by hand or with physical devices.

If blood needs to be taken or an IV started, restraints are important in preventing injury to your infant. If your infant moves while the needle is being inserted, the needle could damage a blood vessel, bone, tissue, or nerves.

Your health care provider will use every means to ensure the safety and comfort of your baby. Beside restraints, other measures include medicines, observation, and monitors.

DURING THE PROCEDURE

Your presence helps your infant during the procedure, especially if the procedure allows you to maintain physical contact. If the procedure is performed at the hospital or your provider's office, you will likely be able to be present.

If you are not asked to be by your infant's side and would like to be, ask your provider if this is possible. If you think you may become ill or anxious, consider keeping your distance, but staying in your infant's line of vision. If you are not able to be present, leaving a familiar object with your infant may be comforting.

OTHER CONSIDERATIONS


Review Date: 10/18/2017
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.