Contracture deformity

Definition

A contracture develops when the normally stretchy (elastic) tissues are replaced by nonstretchy (inelastic) fiber-like tissue. This tissue makes it hard to stretch the area and prevents normal movement.

Contractures mostly occur in the skin, the tissues underneath, and the muscles, tendons, ligaments surrounding a joint. They affect range of motion and function in a certain body part. Often, there is also pain.

Causes

Contracture can be caused by any of the following:

Home Care

Follow your health care provider's instructions for treating contracture at home. Treatments may include: 

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

The provider will ask about your symptoms. Questions may include, when the symptoms began, whether or not you have pain in the affected area, and what treatments you've had in the past.

Depending on the cause and type of contracture, you may need tests such as an x-ray.

Treatment may include physical therapy, medicines, and orthopedic braces. Surgery may be helpful for some types of contractures.


Review Date: 8/15/2018
Reviewed By: C. Benjamin Ma, MD, Professor, Chief, Sports Medicine and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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