Skin discoloration - bluish

Definition

Cyanosis is a bluish color to the skin or mucus membranes that is usually due to a lack of oxygen in the blood.

Considerations

Red blood cells provide oxygen to body tissues. Most of the time, almost all red blood cells in the arteries carry a full supply of oxygen. These blood cells are bright red and the skin has a pinkish or red hue.

Blood that has lost its oxygen is dark bluish-red. People whose blood is low in oxygen tend to have a bluish color to their skin, called cyanosis.

Depending on the cause, cyanosis may develop suddenly, along with shortness of breath and other symptoms.

Cyanosis that is caused by long-term heart or lung problems may develop slowly. Symptoms may be present, but are often not severe.

When oxygen levels have dropped only a small amount, cyanosis may be hard to detect.

In dark-skinned people, cyanosis may be easier to see in the mucus membranes (lips, gums, around the eyes) and nails.

Causes

Cyanosis that is seen in only one part of the body may be due to:

LACK OF OXYGEN IN THE BLOOD

Most cyanosis occurs because of a lack of oxygen in the blood. This can be caused by the following problems.

Problems with the lungs:

Problems with the airways leading to the lungs:

Problems with the heart:

Other problems:

Home Care

For cyanosis caused by exposure to cold or Raynaud phenomenon, dress warmly when going outside or stay in a well-heated room.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Bluish skin (cyanosis) can be a sign of many serious medical problems. Call or visit your health care provider.

For adults, call your doctor or 911 if you have bluish skin and:

For children, call the doctor or 911 if your child has bluish skin and:

What to Expect at Your Office Visit

Your health care provider will perform a physical examination, which includes listening to your breathing and heart sounds. In emergency situations (such as shock), you will be stabilized first.

Medical history questions may include:

Tests that may be performed include:

For shortness of breath and cyanosis, you may receive oxygen.


Review Date: 4/21/2013
Reviewed By: David C. Dugdale, III, MD, Professor of Medicine, Division of General Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of Washington School of Medicine. Also reviewed by A.D.A.M. Health Solutions, Ebix, Inc., Editorial Team: David Zieve, MD, MHA, Bethanne Black, Stephanie Slon, and Nissi Wang.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.