ALP isoenzyme test

Definition

Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) is an enzyme found in many body tissues such as liver, bile ducts, bone, and intestine. There are several different forms of ALP called isoenzymes. The structure of the enzyme depends on where in the body it is produced. This test is most often used to test ALP made in the tissues of the liver and bones.

The ALP isoenzyme test is a lab test that measures the amounts of different types of ALP in the blood.

The ALP test is a related test.

How the Test is Performed

A blood sample is needed. Most of the time blood is drawn from a vein located on the inside of the elbow or the back of the hand.

How to Prepare for the Test

You should not eat or drink anything for 10 to 12 hours before the test, unless your health care provider tells you to do so.

Many medicines can interfere with blood test results.

How the Test will Feel

You may feel slight pain or a sting when the needle is inserted. You may also feel some throbbing at the site after the blood is drawn.

Why the Test is Performed

When the ALP test result is high, you may need to have the ALP isoenzyme test. This test will help determine what part of the body is causing higher ALP levels.

This test may be used to diagnose or monitor:

It may also be done to check liver function and to see how medicines you take may affect your liver.

Normal Results

The normal value is 20 to 140 international units per liter (IU/L) or 33.400 to 233.800 microkat per liter (µKat/L).

Adults have lower levels of ALP than children. Bones that are still growing produce higher levels of ALP. During some growth spurts, levels can be as high as 500 IU/L or 835 µKat/L. For this reason, the test is usually not done in children, and abnormal results refer to adults.

The isoenzyme test results can reveal whether the increase is in "bone" ALP or "liver" ALP.

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Talk to your provider about the meaning of your specific test results.

The example above shows the common measurement range for results for these tests. Some laboratories use different measurements or may test different specimens.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Higher-than-normal ALP levels:

Lower-than-normal levels of ALP:

Levels that are only slightly higher than normal may not be a problem unless there are other signs of a disease or medical problem.


Review Date: 5/21/2017
Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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