Uric acid urine test

Definition

The uric acid urine test measures the level of uric acid in urine.

Uric acid level can also be checked using a blood test.

How the Test is Performed

A 24-hour urine sample is often needed. You will need to collect your urine over 24 hours. Your health care provider will tell you how to do this. Follow instructions exactly.

How to Prepare for the Test

Your provider may ask you to temporarily stop taking medicines that may affect the test results. Be sure to tell your provider about all the medicines you take. These include:

DO NOT stop taking any medicine before talking to your provider.

Be aware that alcoholic drinks, vitamin C, and x-ray dye can also affect test results.

How the Test will Feel

The test involves only normal urination. There is no discomfort.

Why the Test is Performed

This test may be done to help determine the cause of a high uric acid level in the blood. It may also be done to monitor people with gout, and to choose the best medicine to lower the uric acid level in the blood.

Uric acid is a chemical created when the body breaks down substances called purines. Most uric acid dissolves in blood and travels to the kidneys, where it passes out in urine. If your body produces too much uric acid or does not remove enough of it, you may get sick. A high level of uric acid in the body is called hyperuricemia and it can lead to gout or kidney damage.

This test may also be done to check whether a high uric acid level is causing kidney stones.

Normal Results

Normal values range from 250 to 750 mg/24 hours (1.48 to 4.43 mmol/24 hours).

Normal value ranges may vary slightly among different laboratories. Some labs use different measurements or test different samples. Talk to your doctor about the meaning of your specific test results.

What Abnormal Results Mean

A high uric acid level in the urine may be due to:

A low uric acid level in the urine may be due to:

Risks

There are no risks with this test.


Review Date: 7/15/2017
Reviewed By: Laura J. Martin, MD, MPH, ABIM Board Certified in Internal Medicine and Hospice and Palliative Medicine, Atlanta, GA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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