Thrush in newborns

Definition

Thrush is a yeast infection of the tongue and mouth. This common infection can be passed between a mother and baby during breastfeeding.

Causes

Certain germs normally live in our bodies. While most germs are harmless, some can cause infection.

Thrush occurs when too much of a yeast called Candida albicans grows in a baby's mouth. Germs called bacteria and fungi naturally grow in our bodies. Our immune system helps keep these germs in check. But, babies do not have fully formed immune systems. That makes it easier for too much yeast (a type of fungus) to grow.

Thrush often occurs when mother or baby has taken antibiotics. Antibiotics treat infections from bacteria. They can also kill "good" bacteria, and this allows yeast to grow.

The yeast thrives in warm, moist areas. The baby's mouth and the mother's nipples are perfect places for a yeast infection.

Babies can also get a yeast infection on the diaper area at the same time. The yeast gets in the baby's stool and can cause a diaper rash.

Symptoms

Symptoms of thrush in the baby include:

Some babies may not feel anything at all.

Symptoms of thrush in the mother include:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider can often diagnose thrush by looking at your baby's mouth and tongue. The sores are easy to recognize.

Treatment

Your baby might not need any treatment. Thrush often goes away on its own in a few days.

Your provider may prescribe antifungal medicine to treat thrush. You paint this medicine on your baby's mouth and tongue.

If you have a yeast infection on your nipples, your provider may recommend an over-the-counter or prescription antifungal cream. You put this on your nipples to treat the infection.

If both you and your baby have the infection, you both need to be treated at the same time. Otherwise, you can pass the infection back and forth.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Thrush in babies is very common and can easily be treated. But, let your provider know if thrush keeps coming back. It may be a sign of another health issue.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if:

Prevention

You may not be able to prevent thrush, but these steps may help:


Review Date: 10/18/2017
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.