Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection

Definition

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is a disease caused by a type of herpes virus.

Causes

Infection with CMV is very common. The infection is spread by:

Most people come into contact with CMV in their lifetime. But usually, it's people with a weakened immune system, such as those with HIV/AIDS, who become ill from CMV infection. Some otherwise healthy people with CMV infection develop a mononucleosis-like syndrome.

CMV is a type of herpes virus. All herpes viruses remain in your body for the rest of your life after infection. If your immune system becomes weakened in the future, this virus may have the chance to reactivate, causing symptoms.

Symptoms

Many people are exposed to CMV early in life, but do not realize it because they have no symptoms, or they have mild symptoms that resemble the common cold. These may include:

CMV can cause infections in different parts of the body. Symptoms vary depending on the area that is affected. Examples of body areas that can be infected by CMV are:

Exams and Tests

Your health care provider will perform a physical exam and feel your belly area. Your liver and spleen may be tender when they are gently pressed (palpated). You may have a skin rash.

Special lab tests such as a CMV DNA serum PCR test may be done to check for presence of substances in your blood produced by CMV. Tests, such as a CMV antibody test, may be done to check the body's immune response to the CMV infection.

Other tests may include:

Treatment

Most people recover in 4 to 6 weeks without medicine. Rest is needed, sometimes for a month or longer to regain full activity levels. Painkillers and warm salt-water gargles can help relieve symptoms.

Antiviral medicines are usually not used in people with healthy immune function.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Outcome is good with treatment. The symptoms may be relieved in a few weeks to months.

Possible Complications

Throat infection is the most common complication. Rare complications include:

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call for an appointment with your provider if you have symptoms of CMV infection.

Go to the emergency room or call the local emergency number (such as 911) if you have sharp, severe sudden pain in your left upper abdomen. This could be a sign of a ruptured spleen, which may require emergency surgery.

Prevention

CMV infection can be contagious if the infected person comes in close or intimate contact with another person. You should avoid kissing and sexual contact with an infected person.

The virus may also spread among young children in day care settings.

When planning blood transfusions or organ transplants, the CMV status of the donor can be checked to avoid passing CMV to a recipient who has not had CMV infection.


Review Date: 9/22/2018
Reviewed By: Jatin M. Vyas, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor in Medicine, Harvard Medical School; Assistant in Medicine, Division of Infectious Disease, Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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