Femoral hernia

Definition

A hernia occurs when the contents of the abdomen push through a weak point or tear in the muscle wall of the belly. This layer of muscle holds the abdominal organs in place.

A femoral hernia is a bulge in the upper part of the thigh near the groin.

Causes

Most of the time, there is no clear cause of a hernia. Some hernias may be present at birth (congenital), but are not noticed until later in life.

Some factors that contribute to the development of a hernia include:

Femoral hernias tend to occur more often in women than in men.

Symptoms

You may see a bulge in the upper thigh, just below the groin.

Most femoral hernias cause no symptoms. You may have some groin discomfort. It may be worse when you stand, lift heavy objects, or strain.

Sometimes, the first symptoms are:

This may mean that the intestine within the hernia is blocked. This is an emergency.

Exams and Tests

The best way to tell if there is a hernia is to have your health care provider perform a physical exam.

If there is any doubt about the exam findings, an ultrasound or CT scan may be helpful.

Treatment

Treatment depends on the symptoms present with the hernia.

If you feel sudden pain in your groin, a piece of intestine may be stuck in the hernia. This is called an incarcerated hernia. This problem needs treatment right away in an emergency room. You may need emergency surgery.

When you have ongoing discomfort from a femoral hernia, talk to your provider about your treatment choices.

Hernias often get larger as time passes. They do not go away on their own.

Compared to other types of hernias, femoral hernias more commonly have small intestine get stuck in the weak area.

Your surgeon may recommend femoral hernia repair surgery. The surgery is done to avoid a possible medical emergency.

If you do not have surgery right away:

Outlook (Prognosis)

The chances of a femoral hernia coming back after surgery are low.

If the intestine or other tissue becomes stuck, a portion of the intestine may need to be removed.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider or go to the emergency room right away if:

Call your provider if you have a bulge in the upper thigh next to the groin.

Prevention

It is difficult to prevent hernia. Making changes in your lifestyle can help.


Review Date: 9/3/2018
Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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