Gastritis

Definition

Gastritis occurs when the lining of the stomach becomes inflamed or swollen.

Gastritis can last for only a short time (acute gastritis). It may also linger for months to years (chronic gastritis).

Causes

The most common causes of gastritis are:

Less common causes are:

Trauma or a severe, sudden illness such as major surgery, kidney failure, or being placed on a breathing machine may cause gastritis.

Symptoms

Many people with gastritis do not have any symptoms.

Symptoms you may notice are:

If gastritis is causing bleeding from the lining of the stomach, symptoms may include:

Exams and Tests

Tests that may be needed are:

Treatment

Treatment depends on what is causing the problem. Some of the causes will go away over time.

You may need to stop taking aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, or other medicines that may be causing gastritis. Always talk to your health care provider before stopping any medicine.

You may use other over-the-counter and prescription drugs that decrease the amount of acid in the stomach, such as:

Antibiotics may be used to treat chronic gastritis caused by infection with Helicobacter pylori bacteria.

Outlook (Prognosis)

The outlook depends on the cause, but is often very good.

Possible Complications

Blood loss and increased risk for gastric cancer can occur.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call your provider if you develop:

Prevention

Avoid long-term use of substances that can irritate your stomach such as aspirin, anti-inflammatory drugs, or alcohol.


Review Date: 12/27/2018
Reviewed By: Michael M. Phillips, MD, Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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