UPJ obstruction

Definition

Ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction is a blockage at the point where part of the kidney attaches to one of the tubes to the bladder (ureters). This blocks the flow of urine out of the kidney.

Causes

UPJ obstruction mostly occurs in children. It often happens when a baby is still growing in the womb. This is called a congenital condition (present from birth).

The blockage is caused when there is:

As a result, urine builds up and damages kidney.

In older children and adults, the problem may be due to scar tissue, infection, earlier treatments for a blockage, or kidney stones.

UPJ obstruction is the most common cause of urinary blockages in children. It is now commonly found before birth with ultrasound tests. In some cases, the condition may not show up until after birth. Surgery may be needed early in life if the problem is severe. Most of the time, surgery is not needed until later. Some cases do not require surgery at all.

Symptoms

There may not be any symptoms. When symptoms occur, they may include:

Exams and Tests

An ultrasound during pregnancy may show kidney problems in the unborn baby.

Tests after birth may include:

Treatment

Surgery to correct the blockage allows urine to flow normally. Most of the time, open (invasive) surgery is performed in infants. Adults may be treated with less-invasive procedures. These procedures involve much smaller surgical cuts than open surgery, and may include:

Laparoscopy has also been used to treat UPJ obstruction in children and adults who have not had success with other procedures.

A tube called a stent may be placed to drain urine from the kidney until the surgery heals. A nephrostomy tube, which is placed in the side of the body to drain urine, may also be needed for a short time after the surgery. This type of tube may also be used to treat a bad infection before surgery.

Outlook (Prognosis)

Detecting and treating the problem early can help prevent future kidney damage. UPJ obstruction diagnosed before birth or early after birth may actually improve on its own.

Most children do well and have no long-term problems. Serious damage may occur in people who are diagnosed later in life.

Long-term outcomes are good with current treatments. Pyeloplasty has the best long-term success.

Possible Complications

If untreated, UPJ obstruction can lead to permanent loss of kidney function (kidney failure).

Kidney stones or infection may occur in the affected kidney, even after treatment.

When to Contact a Medical Professional

Call the health care provider if your infant has:


Review Date: 4/2/2019
Reviewed By: Sovrin M. Shah, MD, Assistant Professor, Department of Urology, The Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, NY. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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