Day care health risks

Information

Children in day care centers are more likely to catch an infection than kids who do not attend day care. Children who go to day care are often around other kids who may be sick. However, being around the large number of germs in day care may actually improve your child's immune system in the long run.

Infection is spread most often by children putting dirty toys in their mouth. So, check your day care's cleaning practices. Teach your child to wash their hands before eating and after using the toilet. Keep your own children at home if they are sick.

INFECTIONS AND GERMS

Diarrhea and gastroenteritis are common at day care centers. These infections cause vomiting, diarrhea, or both.

Ear infections, colds, coughs, sore throats, and runny noses are common in all children, especially in the day care setting.

Children attending day care are at risk of getting hepatitis A. Hepatitis A is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the liver caused by the hepatitis A virus.

Bug (parasite) infections, such as head lice and scabies are other common health problems that occur in day care centers.

You can do a number of things to keep your child safe from infections. One is to keep your child up-to-date with routine vaccines (immunizations) to prevent both common and serious infections:

Your child's day care center should have policies to help prevent the spread of germs and infections. Ask to see these policies before your child starts. Day care staff should be trained in how to follow these policies. In addition to proper hand washing throughout the day, important policies include:

WHEN YOUR CHILD HAS A HEALTH PROBLEM

Staff may need to know:

You can help by creating an action plan with your provider and making sure your child's day care staff knows how to follow that plan.


Review Date: 10/11/2018
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.