Traveling with children

Definition

Traveling with children presents special challenges. It disrupts familiar routines and imposes new demands. Planning ahead, and involving children in the planning, may lessen the stress of travel.

Recommendations

Talk to your health care provider before traveling with a child. Children may have special medical concerns. The provider can also talk to you about any medicines you might need if your child becomes ill.

Know your child's dosage of common medicines for colds, allergic reactions, or flu. If your child has a long-term (chronic) illness, consider bringing a copy of recent medical reports and a list of all medicines your child is taking.

PLANES, TRAINS, BUSES

Bring snacks and familiar foods with you. This helps when travel delays meals or when the available meals do not suit the child's needs. Small crackers, unsugared cereals, and string cheese make good snacks. Some children can eat fruit without problems. Cookies and sugared cereals make for sticky children.

When flying with babies and infants:

Air travel tends to dehydrate (dry out) people. Drink plenty of water. Women who are nursing need to drink more fluids.

FLYING AND YOUR CHILD'S EARS

Children often have trouble with pressure changes at takeoff and landing. The pain and pressure will almost always go away in a few minutes. If your child has a cold or ear infection, the discomfort may be greater.

Your provider may suggest not flying if your child has an ear infection or a lot of fluid behind the eardrum. Children who have had ear tubes placed should do fine.

Some tips to prevent or treat ear pain:

Ask your doctor before using cold medicines that contain antihistamines or decongestants.

EATING OUT

Try to maintain your normal meal schedule. Ask that your child be served first (you can also bring something for your child to munch on). If you call ahead, some airlines may be able to prepare special kid's meals.

Encourage children to eat normally, but realize that a "poor" diet won't hurt for a few days.

Be aware of food safety. For example, do not eat raw fruits or vegetables. Eat only food that is hot and has been cooked thoroughly. And, drink bottled water not tap water.

ADDITIONAL HELP

Many travel clubs and agencies offer suggestions for traveling with children. Check with them. Remember to ask airlines, train, or bus companies and hotels for guidance and assistance.

For foreign travel, check with your provider about vaccines or medicines to prevent travel-related illness. Also check with embassies or consulate offices for general information. Many guidebooks and websites list organizations that help travelers.


Review Date: 10/11/2018
Reviewed By: Neil K. Kaneshiro, MD, MHA, Clinical Professor of Pediatrics, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

This information should not be used during any medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. A licensed medical professional should be consulted for diagnosis and treatment of any and all medical conditions. Call 911 for all medical emergencies. © 1997- 2007 A.D.A.M., Inc. Any duplication or distribution of the information contained herein is strictly prohibited.