Enteroclysis

Definition

Enteroclysis is an imaging test of the small intestine. The test looks at how a liquid called contrast material moves through the small intestine.

How the Test is Performed

This test is done in a radiology department. Depending on the need, x-ray, CT scan, or MRI imaging is used.

The test involves the following:

The provider can watch on a monitor as the contrast moves through the bowel.

The goal of the study is to view all of the loops of small bowel. You may be asked to change positions during the exam. The test may last a few hours, because it takes a while for the contrast to move through all of the small bowel.

How to Prepare for the Test

Follow your provider's instructions on how to prepare for the test, which may include:

If you are anxious about the procedure, you may be given a sedative before it starts. You will be asked to remove all jewelry and wear a hospital gown. It is best to leave jewelry and other valuables at home. You will be asked to remove any removable dental work, such as appliances, bridges, or retainers.

If you are, or think you're pregnant, tell the provider before the test.

How the Test will Feel

The placement of the tube may be uncomfortable. The contrast material may cause a feeling of abdominal fullness.

Why the Test is Performed

This test is performed to examine the small bowel. It is the most complete way of telling if the small intestine is normal.

Normal Results

There are no problems seen with the size or shape of the small intestine. Contrast travels through the bowel at a normal rate without any sign of blockage.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Many problems of the small intestine can be found with enteroclysis. Some of these include:

Risks

The radiation exposure may be greater with this test than with other types of x-rays because of the length of time. But most experts feel that the risk is low compared to the benefits.

Pregnant women and children are more sensitive to the risks of x-ray radiation. Rare complications include:

Barium may cause constipation. Tell your provider if the barium has not passed through your system by 2 or 3 days after the test, or if you feel constipated.


Review Date: 6/11/2018
Reviewed By: Debra G. Wechter, MD, FACS, general surgery practice specializing in breast cancer, Virginia Mason Medical Center, Seattle, WA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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