Tongue biopsy

Definition

A tongue biopsy is a minor surgery that is done to remove a small piece of the tongue. The tissue is then examined under a microscope.

How the Test is Performed

A tongue biopsy can be done using a needle.

Some types of tongue biopsies remove a thin slice of tissue. Medicine to numb the area (local anesthetic) will be used. Others are done under general anesthesia, (allowing you to be asleep and pain-free) so that a larger area may be removed and examined.

How to Prepare for the Test

You may be told not to eat or drink anything for several hours before the test.

How the Test will Feel

Your tongue is very sensitive so a needle biopsy may be uncomfortable even when numbing medicine is used.

Your tongue can be tender or sore, and it may feel slightly swollen after the biopsy. You may have stitches or an open sore where the biopsy was done.

Why the Test is Performed

The test is done to find the cause of abnormal growths or suspicious-looking areas of the tongue.

Normal Results

The tongue tissue is normal when examined.

What Abnormal Results Mean

Abnormal results may mean:

Risks

Risks for this procedure include:

Complications from this procedure are rare.


Review Date: 2/27/2019
Reviewed By: Josef Shargorodsky, MD, MPH, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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