Endovascular embolization

Definition

Endovascular embolization is a procedure to treat abnormal blood vessels in the brain and other parts of the body. It is an alternative to open surgery.

This procedure cuts off the blood supply to a certain part of the body.

Description

You may have general anesthesia (asleep and pain-free) and a breathing tube. Or, you may be given medicine to relax you, but you will not be asleep.

A small surgical cut will be made in the groin area. The doctor will use a needle to create a hole in the femoral artery, a large blood vessel.

This procedure can take several hours.

Why the Procedure Is Performed

The procedure is most often used to treat aneurysms in the brain. It can also be used for other medical conditions when open surgery might be risky. The goal of the treatment is to prevent bleeding in the problem area and to reduce the risk that the blood vessel will break open (rupture).

Your doctor will help you decide whether it is safer to have surgery to block off the aneurysm before it can rupture.

This procedure may be used to treat:

Risks

Risks from the procedure may include:

Before the Procedure

This procedure is often done on an emergency basis. If it is not an emergency:

After the Procedure

If there was no bleeding before the procedure, you may need to stay in the hospital for 1 to 2 days.

If bleeding occurred, your hospital stay will be longer.

Outlook (Prognosis)

How fast you recover depends on your overall health, the severity of your medical condition, and other factors.

In most cases, endovascular embolization is a successful procedure with good outcomes.

The outlook also depends on any brain damage that occurred from bleeding before, during, or after the surgery.


Review Date: 1/31/2019
Reviewed By: Mary C. Mancini, MD, PhD, Director, Cardiothoracic Surgery, Christus Highland Medical Center, Shreveport, LA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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