Brain aneurysm repair

Definition

Brain aneurysm repair is surgery to correct an aneurysm. This is a weak area in a blood vessel wall that causes the vessel to bulge or balloon out and sometimes burst (rupture). It may cause:

Description

There are two common methods used to repair an aneurysm:

During aneurysm clipping:

During endovascular repair (surgery) of an aneurysm:

Why the Procedure Is Performed

If an aneurysm in the brain breaks open (ruptures), it is an emergency that needs medical treatment in the hospital. Often a rupture is treated with surgery, especially endovascular surgery.

A person may have an unruptured aneurysm without any symptoms. This kind of aneurysm may be found when an MRI or CT scan of the brain is done for another reason.

Risks

Risks of anesthesia and surgery in general are:

Risks of brain surgery are:

Surgery on any one area of the brain may cause problems that may be mild or severe. They may last a short while or they may not go away.

Signs of brain and nervous system (neurological) problems include:

Before the Procedure

This procedure is often done as an emergency. If it is not an emergency:

After the Procedure

A hospital stay for endovascular repair of an aneurysm may be as short as 1 to 2 days if there was no bleeding before surgery.

The hospital stay after craniotomy and aneurysm clipping is usually 4 to 6 days. If there is bleeding or other problems, the hospital stay can be 1 to 2 weeks, or longer.

You will probably have imaging tests of the blood vessels (angiogram) in the brain before you are sent home.

Follow instructions on caring for yourself at home.

Ask your doctor if it will be safe for you to have imaging tests such as angiogram, CT angiogram, or MRI scans of the head in the future.

Outlook (Prognosis)

After successful surgery for a bleeding aneurysm, it is uncommon for it to bleed again.

The outlook also depends on whether brain damage occurred from bleeding before, during, or after surgery.

Most of the time, surgery can prevent a brain aneurysm that has not caused symptoms from becoming larger and breaking open.

You may have more than one aneurysm or the aneurysm that was coiled might grow back. After coiling repair, you will need to be seen by your provider every year.


Review Date: 4/4/2018
Reviewed By: Luc Jasmin, MD, PhD, FRCS (C), FACS, Department of Surgery, Holston Valley Medical Center, TN; Department of Maxillofacial Surgery at UCSF, San Francisco, CA. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, Medical Director, Brenda Conaway, Editorial Director, and the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

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